What is Stingo?

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While certainly cheese is the most important focus here at the blog we do like to consider pairings of food and drink to go along with it in equal measure.  So we arrive at Stingo.

According to Beerpulse:

For the third installment of Boulevard Brewing Company’s Smokestack Collaboration Series, Boulevard brewmaster, Steven Pauwels joins forces with the husband-and-wife team of Dann and Martha Paquette, the driving force behind “gypsy brewer” Pretty Thing Beer and Ale Project. Together, the brewers have produced a modern version of the traditional English ale known as “Stingo.” This rarely-seen, barrel-aged style originated in the north of England, with historical references dating back to the 17th century. The name itself a slang term for sharp, old beer, so called because it “stings” the palate.

Stingo is not a beer style, but rather an “olde” slang word for strong ale or beer produced in England in the 17th and 18th centuries. Sounds worth seeking out, right?

Samuel Smith, back in 2009, released a Stingo, it is only available once a year around England’s “Yorkshire Day,” in August, fromtheir press release:

A traditional strong ale that originated in the north of England, “Stingo” is mentioned in literature before 1700. Samuel Smith’s Stingo melds the signature elegance of the brewery’s ales with a long historical tradition. Brewed from British malts and multiple hop varieties, Stingo is fermented in open-topped stone Yorkshire Squares, then aged over a year in oak barrels that previously held cask-conditioned ale, gaining subtle complexity from the wood. Some of the barrels at Samuel Smith’s are over a century old – if a cask is damaged, the coopers carefully replace broken staves and put the cask back into service.

If you were lucky enough to find this new collaboration or the Samuel Smith, an earthy cheese such as a  Colston-Bassett Stilton, the nuttiness of a Comté or a wash-rind such as Cowgirl Creamery Red Hawk would stand well with this aged, robust brew.

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Today is marked…

Today is marked clearly as tax day however I do like to look on the glass as half full of milk side.  So it is with glee that today’s calendar marks the start of milking season for Parmigiano-Reggiano.

The milking season runs from April 15 to about November 11 ensuring that the unpastuerized milk produced comes only from fresh pasture. The cheese started today is aged 14 months.  The cheese wheel is removed from its mold after a few days, washed with brine over the course of several weeks forming a rind.  The wheels are then placed on very tall wooden shelves and are brushed and turned throughout the aging process.  (See the video — imagine the aroma!)

This short and informative video was produced by Cravero Cheese Cellars (there’s some very artistic b&w photos of the terroir and process at that link) who have been doing so for 150 years.

Parmigiano Reggiano

Today is marked clearly as tax day I do like to look on the glass half full of milk side.  So it is with glee that today’s calendar marks the start of milking season for Parmigiano-Reggiano.

The milking season runs from April 15 to about November 11 ensuring that the unpastuerized milk produced comes only from fresh pasture. The cheese started today is aged 14 months.  The cheese wheel is removed from its mold after a few days, washed with brine over the course of several weeks forming a rind.  The wheels are then placed on very tall wooden shelves and are brushed and turned throughout the aging process.  (See the video — imagine the aroma!) 

This short and informative video was produced by Cravero Cheese Cellars (there’s some very artistic b&w photos of the terroir and process at that link) who have been doing so for 150 years.